Friday, June 12, 2015

Rethinking armor for Ruins & Ronin Deluxe Edition

Ruins & Ronin Deluxe Edition Armor Types
I have found that even though I love the “thought” of using piecemeal armor for Ruins & Ronin, in practice it becomes very cumbersome at the table in actual play. So currently I am struggling with how I want to offer up armor in the new edition of the game. I may offer up two choices so those that prefer a “gritty” approach of knowing each piece of armor can still enjoy their game, but for those like me, who just want to know a basic AC score and keep the game moving I offer the below rules.


General Armor Classes
In this system, there are 4 categories of armor (much like original D&D with leather, chain, and plate) for players to choose from: Light, Medium, Heavy, and Full. Each category is based on pieces of the detailed armor system so  both could be used by different players in the same game, if desired.

Light Armor (AC 7) consists of:
Jingasa (helmet)
Haramaki-do  (chest/belly armor)
Cost: 65 gp
Weight: 22 lbs

Medium Armor (AC 5) consist of:
Jingasa (helmet)
Haramaki-do (chest/belly armor)
Haidate (groin/upper leg armor)
Cost: 105 gp
Weight: 32 lbs

Heavy Armor (AC 3) consists of:
Jingasa (helmet)
Haramaki-do (chest/belly armor)
Sode (arm armor)
Haidate (groin/upper leg armor)
Cost: 155 gp
Weight: 42 lbs

Full Armor (the O-yori) (AC 0) consists of a full crafted suit of armor:
Kabuto (full helmet with face mask)
Haramaki-do (chest/belly armor)
Sode (arm armor)
Kote (shoulder armor)
Haidate (groin/upper leg armor)
Suneate (lower leg armor)
Cost: 500* gp
Weight: 64 lbs
*cost reflects this suit is hand-crafted by master armorers.

Armor Piece
AC
Cost
Wt
haidate
-2
50 gp
10
haramaki-do
-2
60 gp
20
Jingasa
-1
5 gp
2
kabuto
-2
100 gp
4
kote
-1
50 gp
10
sode
-1
5o gp
10
suneate
-1
20 gp
10


5 comments:

  1. You and I appear to be following the same general train of thought with regard to Oriental Adventures games. I just split armor into 3 categories to eliminate the cumbersome piecemeal armor system- Light, Medium and Heavy. I switched to ascending AC though, as it seems easier to teach newbies.

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  2. When i run mine I prefer the light, medium, heavy classification as well. it is just easier for those of us who enjoy martial arts and samurai films but find remembering proper oriental names, etc difficult.

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  3. iI like having both options as it allows for different styles of play.

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  4. Certainly agree about ditching that inane piecemeal armor system from the original OA. I'm doing the same with my wuxia rules.

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  5. Back when I was researching Japanese armor, I initially thought to do something similar, where amount of coverage determined base AC. However, after a lot of research, I just decided to go with a system based on the type of armor, like AD&D with leather, chain, plate, etc., but with some Japanese styles incorporated in place of certain Western styles. Tatami-do (a type of backed plate & chain) in the place of splint, lamellar armor instead of "banded mail", and Kikko in the place of studded leather (though it's actually brigandine). Throw in the Japanese names for the various other types of armor (leather, chain, plate, etc.) a decent range of helms, skip shields since they were uncommon (yes there were shields, a variety of types, but they weren't commonly used, with the exception of pavaise-like tate in sieges and naval engagements) and I've found that it works just as well in keeping both the flavor and ease of utility I like.

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